Author Archives: an athlete's body

About an athlete's body

Your body is a pretty cool thing. Wouldn't it be cool if you understood more about how it worked? A lot of information sources out there focus on developing your athletic engine. That's important! But it rarely has anything to do with your injuries, or maximizing your mechanics. This blog is here to educate and develop your chassis, so that your engine works better. Because no one likes to sit bench. An athlete's body moves with mobility and control. This is for you. This is An Athlete's Body.

LAVA Magazine comes to visit

LAVA Magazine came to visit, check out what they had to say, and find some tips to help your knee cap move like it should.

And if you want to read a snippet on the latest with now-local phenom Kate Grace- check this out here!

today, do something that scares you, something that challenges you, and something that makes you laugh. Its how we grow.

THE Textbook of Running Medicine – yup, hot off the presses!

Screen Shot 2014-04-15 at 2.14.59 AMMany years ago, the first edition of the Textbook of Running Medicine was published. It was an amazing conglomeration of peer-reviewed research to help all clinicians who deal with running athletes in one hard-bound source. It sold out world-wide and was out of print.

Well, over the past 2 years, the team has been hard at it yet again for the second edition. I’m happy to announce that the 2nd edition is now out. If you are a physician, therapist, or trainer, you need this book. Period. Nothing else compares. I’d like to applaud the work of the editors (all of whom I’m proud to call colleagues and friends) Dr. Bob Wilder, Dr Fran O’Connor, and Eric Magrum.  I applaud the work of all the writers who contributed to this amazing work. You just might find a chapter from yours truly in there as well.

Check out this link to order your copy today!

The Dynasty of Running Medicine Continues

photo 1-11The University of Virginia Running Medicine Conference continues to be the premier source of training and applied knowledge for clinicians across the country. I’ve been lucky enough to co-direct this course with my colleagues Dr. Robert Wilder and Eric Magrum for the past twelve years. We assembled an entourage of experts to bring us up to speed on the latest research, and how this applies to our patients.  And this year, we had requests to expand into talks on performance planning and progression, and we delivered.

From the clinical side:
Dr. Fran O’Connor described findings of “Exertional Rhabdomyolysis”. Its great that the endurance community is embracing strength training. However, going to big too soon can lead to some serious health implications. Dr. O’Connor described how to identify these signs and symptoms when people go a little too aggressively in CrossFit and other competitive environments, and how to ensure that you are progressing training appropriately.

Dr. Wilder described “The Runner With Heel Pain.” Sure your plantar fascia can be the driver of your nagging pain, but there are other structures in this area that drive symptoms, and other areas that can refer to the heal. He reviewed what these are, and how to manage them for success. And on Saturday, Dr. Wilder led a water running lab to discuss tips to ensure high physiologic training stress to maintain fitness while placing the body in a reduced training load.

“The Great Toe” was presented by Eric Magrum. Conservative clinical management of the big toe is essential to proper foot stability. We reviewed normal foot function, problematic scenarios, and how to address each. The one-two punch was saturday’s lab session with hands on evaluation and treatment.

But sometimes, the great toe isn’t so great. Dr Joe Park presented “The Not-So-Great Toe” and discussed the skilled surgical management of the foot and lower leg when conservative care hasn’t worked. Dr Park presented the current state of care for foot management, how this impacts the entire lower quarter, presented some case studies to offer real world application, and innovative, outside the box solutions for correction of serious disorders.

Dr. Siobhan Statuta wasn’t stressed out when she presented “You’re Stressing Me Out! – a review of foot stress fractures.” We reviewed the identification, management, and return to play criteria to ensure successful care.

Dr. John McKnight had some great content (and great pictures) of “common skin conditions of the foot” – we discussed everything from blisters to foot fungus to serious infections, and how to treat these from a clinical as well as a practical approach. Yes, make that one more use for duct tape.

Have you ever wondered what happens “inside” the muscle, and why some tissues sustain strain injuries (tears) more than others? Dr. Silvia Blemker presented the engineering side of the equation. She showed her innovative work with real-time MRI and how the shape of the aponeurosis affects the stress and strain of muscular forces, and how we can learn more in the future in our efforts to prevent injury. In short, muscle architecture matters.

Now, we’ve discussed how to get runner’s healthy, let’s look beyond into the world of performance.

Have you ever wondered what type of cutting edge training principles are employed by Olympic athletes? and why this works? Our keynote speaker Dr. Brad DeWesse identified what constitutes successful athletic performance, and how to cycle your training to achieve it. Sure there’s an “art” to coaching, but is’t it nice when you can make things objective? Brad was able to present data points on values they assess on all their athletes, how they implement training for targeted improvements in the lab, and what kind of outcome this has in the real world. Impact? The US has won more medals in the sports Brad is working with. Its the stuff of genius.

With a formula for successful training in front of us, yours truly provided an overview talk called “Run Better: Clinical, Strength, and Power Prep for Strength and Endurance Athletes.” We identified how to put a better body into your overall plan: how to screen for muscle imbalances that restrict optimal physical development, how to fix them, and most importantly, how to integrate these skills into running mechanics. Following this, I presented real world case scenarios (with data) to show how this impacts both quantitive lab values and race times. Result? Pain free runners that are setting good numbers in the lab and PR’s on the course.

I’d like to thank over 230 physicians and therapists who attended, and about 100 of you who return each and every year. This course almost seems like a small family at this point, and we greatly appreciate your support, enthusiasm, ad feedback each year. Dr Wilder, Eric, and myself wish you success in implementing these concepts with your patients and athletes!

 

a new way to train for running. Lava magazine and Linsey Corbin lead the way

Its not all blood, sweat, and grinding to the same ‘ol tune.

Lava magazine spoke to Linsey Corbin to discuss the innovative things we did together to rehab her injury and get her ready to run Kona. Yup, a 9 mile long run, plus some outside the box thinking = a 3:04 marathon at IM world championships.Check out the full article for the story by Lava. 

Training the old way is boring. Training the new way is faster (and fun!)

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“How to Train Like an Olympian” – NBC finds out!

If you want pull a 1080 Japan air in the half pipe, launch yourself 100 yards on downhill skis, or accelerate a bobsled to peak speed before jumping in, science can help you do what you do, better.

NBC came by our lab for a little demo, you can check it out here. (updated with the video link)

Note:  Just don’t ask me anything about curling…….

Webinar of the month: Running Footwear

USA Triathlon selected my webinar “Running Footwear:  A critical look at what we know about footwear, and how to select the right shoes for your athlete.” as the February spotlight. This presentation is loaded with objective information and references to understand what shoes do (and don’t do) and help you see past the marketing hype to select the right tool for your runs.

Smarter runners make smarter decisions on footwear!

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Anatomy for Runners: Top 9 Thought Provoking Books of 2013

Its always nice to get a shout out. Steve Magness is one of the “better thinkers” in the world of running, coaching, and athlete performance, and I respect his opinion highly. Apparently, Steve is nice enough to respect mine as well, and named Anatomy for Runners as one if his “Top 9 Though Provoking Books of 2013″ – thanks Steve. If you live under a rock, and haven’t come across his amazing blog, I highly recommend checking it out: the Science of Running.

And while I’m at it, I’d like to say thanks to all of you who have purchased the book. I teach all over the country, and the number of clinicians and coaches who already have the book, and actually USE it daily on their teams and patients is, well, quite humbling. I know the little niche I operate in will never reach the status of the Harry Potter, but there are over 11,000 of you around the world reading this book over the past year. I hope its making you rethink the way you approach your training, and your patients, your teams, and ultimately producing better results. If you’d like to pick up a copy, click on the link on the right side of the page!

The work of a decade of my career, bound into the "take home version" for you.

The work of a decade of my career, bound into the “take home version” for you.

Don’t just sit there!

The Washington Post published a really nice info-graphic on the health implications of prolonged sitting. They recruited a panel of experts, of which I was lucky to be a part. They did a knock out job with it, and I won’t take any more of your time other than to point you to the original source here.

Cliff Notes version: doing too much of one thing…..ANY one thing…..is not good for us. Motion keeps your muscles active to keep your body stable, your joints lubed, and your internal organs primed for normal body upkeep. Check out the link for the full monty.

PS – after you read it, get up and walk around!

Brain Camps and Tri-camp: education for you and yours this new year

Happy NY! and with a new year, hopefully comes new stuff to put in your brain. Some of the knowledge below will help with your patients (talking to you MD’s and PT’s) , some will help your clients (hey coach!), and some is for you the athlete ( yup – come spoil yourself in a complete winter triathlon immersion camp here in Bend, OR). Together, we’ll discuss research and concepts that guide our thought process and training, do hands on assessments, drills, and interventions to help us all do what we do better.

Jan 16-17th
I’m headed back home to New Orleans to teach at the USA Triathlon Certification Course. If you are seeking to get certified as a Level 1 coach, or if you are a current USAT LEvel 1 coach and looking to get your Youth Coaching certification, follow this link for details. As a bonus, I’ll be offering a course on thursday the 16th on “Bike Fit for Performance” – of note, you can register for the Bike Fit talk even if you aren’t planning on going to the full Triathlon certification course. Click here for registration info on both.

Jan 25-26
Calling all Physicians, Therapists, and Athletic Trainers: Join us for the Health Running Course in beautiful and sunny Laguna Niguel, CA. Check out the link for an action packed weekend of peer-reviewed clinical knowledge and hands-on sessions designed to help you help your patients. At the end of the day, run along the cliffs and go for a surf. Not a bad place to be in January!

Jan 31st – Feb 2
Athletes, this one is for you. the REP Lab is hosting its first annual Winter Triathlon Skills Camp. We’ll talk shop, you’ll talk to professional triathletes, you’ll outline off-season conditioning plans and strength routines, do swimming form clinics, performance bike fits, and a 3D instrumented runing gait analysis. That’s right – a complete soup-to-nuts guided plan. Bring your 2014 goals, your gear, and a notepad, because we designed this camp to build a better you and a better season. NOW is the time of the year to make things better  - don’t wait until 2 weeks before your first race! More info in the link.

March 7th -8th
Clinicians, this is not to be missed. Join us at the longest running, running-speciifc CME course out there: UVA Running MedicineThis 11th annual event will be a dual focus on foot and ankle mechanics as well as strength and power development for endurance runners, field athletes, and sprinters. We are very excited to have Dr. Brad DeWeese as our keynote presenter this year. As of today- there are a few spots left for the Saturday hands-on lab, so register soon if you’d like to join us (the lab will sell out). Note: this isn’t a simple link – click here, then click on “live conferences” and then scroll down until you see “UVA Running Medicine” – you can download the brochure and register from there.

A lot of time and energy goes into each of these events to ensure that you have the best experience possible –  Hope to see you soon!